Sprint still doesn’t support the 463 (IND) area code

The 463 area code entered service on March 15, 2016, as an overlay of the 317 area code that was already assigned to the Indianapolis area. More than two years later, Sprint still doesn’t offer 463 phone numbers.

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area_codes_317_and_463

The Indiana Regulatory Commission announced that area code 463 would be added in 2016 as an overlay. The new area code, which coincidentally also spells out IND on a standard telephone keypad. 463 entered service on March 15, 2016. On that date, a permissive dialing period began during which both seven- and ten-digit calls would be able to complete. Ten-digit dialing was originally to become mandatory in the Indianapolis area on September 15, 2016. However, on August 31, in response to an appeal from security alarm companies, the deadline was extended to October 15, 2016. Indianapolis had been one of the few major cities where seven-digit dialing was still possible.

PowerShell Functions to Get Logged On User and Logoff Logged On User

Two helpful PowerShell functions to help you check who is logged on remotely and to remotely log them off.

Remotely Get a Logged On User

This Get-LoggedOnUser will use Get-WmiObject to tell you who is logged on to a remote computer. You may use a comma-delimited list of computer names.

Function:

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function Get-LoggedOnUser
	{
		[CmdletBinding()]
		param
		(
			[Parameter()]
			[ValidateScript({ Test-Connection -ComputerName $_ -Quiet -Count 1 })]
			[ValidateNotNullOrEmpty()]
			[string[]]$ComputerName = $env:COMPUTERNAME
		)
	foreach ($comp in $ComputerName)
		{
			$output = @{ 'ComputerName' = $comp }
			$output.UserName = (Get-WmiObject -Class win32_computersystem -ComputerName $comp).UserName
			[PSCustomObject]$output
		}
	}

Example:

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Get-LoggedOnUser -ComputerName "SERVER01", "SERVER02", "SERVER03"

Remotely Logoff a Logged On User

This LogOff-LoggedOnUser function will use Get-WmiObject to log off a user. You may use a comma-delimited list of computer names.

Function:

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function LogOff-LoggedOnUser
	{
		[CmdletBinding()]
		param
		(
			[Parameter()]
			[ValidateScript({ Test-Connection -ComputerName $_ -Quiet -Count 1 })]
			[ValidateNotNullOrEmpty()]
			[string[]]$ComputerName = $env:COMPUTERNAME
		)
		foreach ($comp in $ComputerName)
		{
			$output = @{ 'ComputerName' = $comp }
			$output.UserName = (Get-WmiObject -Class win32_operatingsystem -ComputerName $comp).Win32Shutdown(4)
			[PSCustomObject]$output
		}
	}

Example:

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LogOff-LoggedOnUser -ComputerName "SERVER01", "SERVER02", "SERVER03"

Is Roger Ver claiming he is Bitcoin’s founder Satoshi Nakamoto?

On June 27, 2018, the People’s Labour Party, a political party in Saint Kitts and Nevis led by the country’s prime minister Timothy Harris, posted the following on Twitter:

The first #Bitcoin ATM Machine in the Caribbean has just been installed in #StKitts. There will be 4 Machines across the island with the first one installed by Bitcoin Founder @rogerkver and associate Alex Lewis at the “The Mill” Cafe at the Oceans Edge Development in Frigate Bay

There are many inaccuracies with this tweet. The most egregious, however, is that Roger Ver convinced Saint KittsPeoples Labour Party that he is Bitcoin‘s Founder Satoshi Nakamoto.

In August 2017, Roger Ver performed a hard fork of Bitcoin (BTC) by copying all of its code and blockchain history to form his own separate, alternative, and centralized coin called Bitcoin Cash (BCH).

Bitcoin’s code is open source, so there’s nothing wrong with copying its code to make your own coin. But Ver has frequently made claims that his coin, Bitcoin Cash (BCH), is the real Bitcoin (BTC) when it is not.

It now appears that Ver’s ability to confuse people about who he is and the cryptocurreny he represents has escalated — for Roger Ver has convinced a small country’s political party that he is Bitcoin’s founder Satoshi Nakamoto.

While I cannot disprove that Roger Ver is not Satoshi Nakamoto, it is unlikely that he is.

What I can point out are some of the fallacies of the above tweet:

  • Bitcoin ATM (incorrect): What was deployed, as stated by Roger Ver in the video of him standing next to the ATM, was a Bitcoin Cash ATM. If the People’s Labour Party thinks that Saint Kitts received four Bitcoin ATMs; then they were conned by Roger Ver, who says on video that they are Bitcoin Cash ATMs.
  • First Bitcoin ATM in the Caribbean (incorrect): According to Coin ATM Radar, Bitcoin ATMs already exist in Anguilla, Aruba, Barbados, Dominica Republic, and Jamaica; all of which are Caribbean countries. This may be, however, the first Bitcoin Cash ATM in the Caribbean.
  • Bitcoin Founder Roger Ver (likely incorrect): It is unlikely that Roger Ver is Bitcoin’s founder Satoshi Nakamoto. If he isn’t, he shouldn’t be convincing political parties or anyone else that he is.

As for the People’s Labour Party and citizens of Saint Kitts, it appears they were tricked into thinking they were getting Bitcoin ATMs delivered to them personally by Bitcoin’s founder. Instead, they received four Bitcoin Cash ATMs delivered to them by Roger Ver, the founder of Bitcoin Cash (not Bitcoin).

Ticketmaster requires users to agree to their Terms of Use before reading them

When you visit www.ticketmaster.com you might notice in the footer a statement that says “By continuing past this page, you agree to our Terms of Use.”

In order for a Ticketmaster customer to read either their Terms of Use or their Privacy Policy, they would have to blindly agree to both before reading them.

I would like to know what both the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy say before agreeing to them. Neither Ticketmaster Support at 1 (800) 653-8000 nor Twitter accounts @ticketmaster.com and @TMfanSupport offered a way.

It appears that if you want to use Ticketmaster.com and first visited any page other than the Terms of Use page, you’ll have to agree to their terms before reading them.

Unwanted solicitation from Ryan Tello of Rydek Professional Staffing

I received an unpleasant solicitation from Ryan Tello today, the Vice President of Client Development for Rydek Professional Staffing out of Corona, California.

The unwanted phone call began as normal. Ryan gave a two- to four-minute pitch introducing himself, his company, and service. While these unwanted solicitations are tiresome and ignore my publicly posted request for privacy; Ryan Tello was both normal and polite during the early stages of the call.

I responded by saying “No thank you;” but Ryan wasn’t ready to give up and began asking for reasons why. When I said “Honestly, I avoid doing business with companies that perform cold calls and cold emails (as stated in my Privacy Policy),” he became upset and reacted poorly.

Ryan started with the typical “How will you learn about my product or service?” and similar questions already addressed in my Do Not Solicit FAQ. He then wanted to know my job title and responsibilities, which I replied, “I’m sorry, we do not discuss job titles, responsibilities, or system infrastructure with unsolicited callers.”

My reason is that there is no easy way to distinguish a sales call from a social engineering attack — both are initiated by the potential bad actor and both are an attempt to learn more about a company, individual, system, or process.

That’s when Ryan Tello began his ad hominem attack, stating that I must be a terrible person to work for. I asked him to please don’t call again. He said that he would keep calling — often — and will keep asking for different employees until someone speaks with him.

Ryan,

I politely said that I was not interested in your company or services, that I avoid doing business with companies that cold call and cold email, and that I would not answer your questions. You responded with personal attacks, followed by threats that you will keep calling and harassing other employees. Please don’t. You are the bad actor here. You ignored my request for privacy and threatened to harass my coworkers in the future.

I’ve warned my coworkers of your behavior and intentions. I further hope that his blog post may warn others of your potential irrational behavior and personal attacks.

Please don’t solicit me or my coworkers again. May this post serve as an additional Do Not Solicit and Opt Out request to you and your employer. Thank you.

Company: Rydek Professional Staffing
Company President: Adam Reinhardt
VP of Client Development: Ryan Tello